Where Can I Take a Shower?

By Stephanie Thomas

It’s something we take for granted. We get up in the morning and take a shower. If we need to wash our hands we go to the sink. If we want to wash our clothes we put them in the wash. For people living on the street and in tents, getting clean and staying clean is not so easy. Fortunately, in Greensboro, we have the Interactive Resource Center on Washington Street. For people who are homeless, being able to go there and take a shower and wash clothes is a real blessing. Unfortunately, for people who live away from downtown, it can be difficult for them to get to the IRC, especially on a daily basis. In California Doniece Sandoval came up with a solution: She turned retired city buses into mobile shower units. 

http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/01/health/cnn-hero-doniece-sandoval-lava-mae/index.html

 

 

Hannah’s Haven

By Stephanie Thomas

Drug addiction is a growing problem, destroying lives, and stealing the future from our young people. With an increasing need and insufficient resources, help is not always available. But for a few, there is Hannah’s Haven.

The faces of the recovering addicts at Hannah’s Haven were those of 4 young women. Before I arrived for the interview, I didn’t realize I had met them before. At the time I thought they were college students. They didn’t look like recovering drug addicts. They looked like young women, which of course, is exactly who they are.

Hannah’s Haven is a Teen Challenge addiction recovery facility specifically designed for young women. Located in Brown Summit, the 3 bedroom house is surrounded by woods and fields, in an atmosphere that is quiet and peaceful. Every aspect of the house feels like a home. It’s comfortable, nicely decorated, and spotless. The most recent update to the bathrooms, we’re done by the residence.

I sat down with the director and founder Bonnie Harris. Her dedication and compassion are apparent. She shared with me her personal story of recovery from drug addiction and how she felt God used that struggle to bring her to a place of helping others. She in turn shares these personal lessons with her residence, which helps them in their recovery.

The residence enter a structured and well disciplined program, rising each day at 6:00 am, working through classes, counseling, and doing chores. Admittance can cost up to a $1000, but Bonnie said she wants recovery to be affordable so she does not let a lack of financial resources keep someone from entering the program.

Ninety-six young women have gone through the 9-12 month recovery program since Hannah’s Haven first opened its doors over a decade ago. Many of those women have gone on to live happy and productive lives.

“Addiction is just what we see,” Bonnie said. “It is merely a symptom of what is really going on inside. When you take the drug away you are left with the individual. Sometimes that individual has to get in touch with who they are. We take them on a deep journey, back to the first time they felt rejection and then we work towards healing and recovery.”

Bonnie invited me to join the morning class. The girls were working through a study book with lessons and scripture. The book and the discussion were designed to teach good life choices, and change old patterns into healthy ones. The women were open about their issues and struggles. One of the women, who had served in a ministry, shared her effort to find recovery.

“In desperation I moved to a new place. I thought the change would help, but I took my problems with me.”

In spite of her good intentions, she found recovery impossible to achieve on her own. But now, with the help of the staff at Hannah’s Haven, she is making progress.

The biggest challenge for Hannah’s Haven is money. Fundraising is a large part of what Bonnie does. Besides the day to day expenses, she wants to expand the facility to make room for more women. Also in the planning stages is a thrift shop that will help the organization be more self-sufficient.

If you are interested in having Bonnie Harris speak to your organization or church about Hanna’s Haven, she is available.

 

Quotes from people without homes…

Quotes from people who are homeless…

 

“I am going to make something of my life. It might be rough but things will get better for me.” Quashana

“It’s as if I am looking through a window trying to reach the world on the other side.”  Amanda

“I appreciate the little things in life and thank God for all he has given me.” Susan

“I never thought I would find myself in this situation at my age.” Karon

“All I can say is, if I can do it you can too. Be encouraged today. You can change if you want to.” Tony  on his recovery from drug addiction

 

Greensboro Voice Mission Statement

Our newspaper aims to serve as a vehicle for elevating voices and public discussion on issues that are not frequently covered in mainstream media outlets. These issues include homelessness, facing potential homelessness and the resources available to help those in need. This newspaper is for everyone: people experiencing homelessness, students, parents and anyone else who wants to have his or her voice heard. We hope the awareness gained from our newspaper will encourage the community to have a discussion about issues and people who are normally ignored.

Invictus

Out of the night that covers me
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.
In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced or cried aloud.
Under the bludgeoning of chance
My head is bloody but unbowed.
Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds and shall find me unafraid.
It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll.
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.
-W.E. Henley

Do Not Judge

By Lori Shepard

Do not judge

Do not assume

To know the life of

That stranger in the room

Or across the street

Holding a sign

Or standing and waiting

There on the line

Their life story

You cannot know

Just by looking

High and low

It’s true that some

Are in despair

But you don’t know

What  put them there

So do not judge

Do not assume

Why not smile

Across the room

Read that sign

Be more aware

At the very least

Offer up a prayer

Find a way

If you can

To make a difference

To your fellow man

Find a cause

To work or finance

Help someone else

To have a chance

Count your blessings

Find something to do

Remember, in an instant

That stranger could be you

Jim Rettig  1/25/54 – 01/17/17

Jim Rettig  1/25/54 – 01/17/17
Jim Rettig  1/25/54 – 01/17/17

by Bob Norfleet

Jim Rettig passed away last week. He leaves behind two sons and a sister. Jim was originally from Michigan. He came to Greensboro looking for a job after the recession put him out of a work. When I first met Jim at the Interactive Resource Center in 2015, he was homeless, jobless and broke. He also had no driver’s license which put him at a serious disadvantage. At that time, Jim was living at the Weaver House, a temporary homeless shelter operated by Greensboro Urban Ministry.

Jim had a couple of skills which he hoped would put him back into gainful employment. He was an artist and web designer.  Unfortunately, neither field was hiring in Greensboro during or even after the economic recovery.

Jim joined the staff of the Greensboro Voice in 2015. He was very involved with all discussions, attended every staff meeting , wrote several articles, and would frequently cause laughter with his dry humor. Jim created and submitted several items of whimsical art for the Greensboro Voice which reflected that humor. A couple of years ago Jim also designed the honor card for the IRC’s year end fundraising program which was a sketch he did of the Greensboro Bus Depot.

In early 2016, Jim was approved for housing and soon afterwards he secured a part time job with UNCG helping people connect with medical benefits.  Things were looking up for Jim but in 2016 he suffered a stroke. After making so much progress in his life, Jim wasn’t going to let it get him down and before long he’d bounced back and was his old self again.

Jim was always grateful, even for the smallest kindness shown to him by others.  He was especially grateful for finding and joining a new church where he met and made many new friends. And he always seemed to find humor and hope even when he was struggling to find work and living in homelessness.  I will miss Jim, and most of all I will miss his ability to find humor in even the most dire moments of life.

 (The Interactive Resource Center or IRC is a day center for people experiencing homelessness or near homelessness.)

A Beggar’s Story “Marsha”

by Stephanie Thomas

I saw her standing on the corner. She was bundled up in a heavy coat, hat and gloves. It was a bitterly cold day. I had seen her a couple of times before but I was always too busy to stop and speak to her. This time wasn’t any different except that I decided that speaking to her was more important than getting my chores done on time.

I pulled into the parking lot of a restaurant that was across the street and made my way through the traffic to where she stood. She smiled when she saw me walking toward me.

I introduced myself and asked her about her day. She said she was cold and didn’t feel well.

“I have a lot of health issues,” she said. “My biggest problem is with the arthritis in my knees.”

“You are too young to have arthritis,” I said ,trying make her feel better.

“Thank you but I’m 55 years old.”

“What’s your name?”

“Marsha.”

“Where do you live Marsha?”

“I stay with friends mostly. I used to put homeless on my sign but people gave me a hard time about it. I try not to wear out my welcome. I stay quiet and to myself. I’ve stayed in hotels but I can’t afford to do that right now.”

She waved at a red SUV that passed us.

“That women gave me this hat and these gloves,” she said appreciatively.

“That was nice of her,” I said. “How do people treat you out here?”

“Some people are nice. Sometimes men give me money and then tell me they’ll give me more if I’ll come home with them. I know what that means. I’m not going to sell myself. I always tell them no. I’ve learned not to trust men. I’ve had problems with them. They start out nice but they always end up abusing me. The last man I was with beat me and made me feel terrible about myself. I wanted to leave him but he hid the car keys and took my phone so I couldn’t get away. One day, when he was sleeping, I found my phone and called my girlfriend to come and get me. That was 5 years ago. I’m still not over him.”

“You have had a rough time. I’m sorry you had to go through that. What about family? Is there anyone here who can help you?”

My parents and my brother passed away. I was close to them. It’s really hard for me at Christmas time. I miss them.”

Marsha doesn’t have a job. She was fired from her last job when there was a discrepancy in the cash drawer. That incident and her age make it unlikely that anyone will be willing to hire her. She isn’t old enough to get social security which means disability insurance is her only option, besides begging. She told me she has applied for disability insurance, but it takes at least 3 years to qualify.

There is a system in place to help people like Marsha. Unfortunately, the red tape is difficult  work through, the process can be humiliating, and failure is more common than success. For someone like Marsha, who has been abused and is alone in this world, begging seems easier.

 

Friends

 

By Natasha Toussaint

On the first day of work orientation, I befriended Kenneth, a co-worker. Kenneth was always well-dressed, always in a good mood, and hysterically funny. He excelled in all of the training modules, and helped me when I had difficulties with the material. When we had settled into our work, I was able to rely on Kenneth to help me with work-related snags, and on occasion we ate lunch together.
Kenneth had a son who was a College Junior. Kenneth beamed with pride when he talked about him. He often said his son was his best friend.

One week, Kenneth was unable to get his usual ride home. He asked if I would take him. Later that week, after we finished taking care of some of his errands, I asked him if there was anywhere else he needed to go, like the grocery store, or if he would like to get something to eat. He said no and looked at his watch. I took the hint and asked if he would like me to drop him off at the library where I’d picked him up.

“No,” he replied. “You can drop me off at the Salvation Army. I’m homeless.”
I was stunned. Kenneth had been homeless for over 5 years due to a series of unfortunate life events.

In hindsight, I realized why Kenneth was more excited about the new job than the rest of us. For him the job meant change and stability. He hoped one day to get a place of his own.
Kenneth gave me the opportunity to change my perspective of homeless individuals. Homelessness is not a look, an attitude, behavior or a condition. Homelessness is a life situation that for a multitude of reasons can befall any of us, at any time.

Community Ventures: A Non-Profit Serving “Not-For-Profit Social Ventures”

bob-website

by Bob Norfleet

Many small not-for-profit social ventures attempt to set up shop but fail, not because of a lack of passion or vision but due to a difficulty in gathering startup capital. In most cases, it’s difficult to get funding because there are so many charities begging for the same dollars. In order to be successful and attract donor dollars, a charity quickly learns that it should be certified as a “non-profit” by the Internal Revenue Service. It’s expensive to hire a lawyer, get incorporated, apply for and receive the official 501(c)3 non-profit certification letter by the IRS. When a non-profit finally receives IRS certification, it may then seek funds from donors who desire the additional rewards of a tax deduction for their donation. If your charity has not been certified as a 501(c)3 organization, your donors will not receive a tax benefit.

The person who wants to start a charity must either have the money for 501(c)3 certification or beg for dollars from friends, friends-of-friends and/or set up a crowd-funding network to raise the start-up capital. Crowd funding, if done correctly can be beneficial but few people know all the strategic moves that must be taken during the process to reach their goal. The most successful crowd funding programs are those which are associated with a charity that is already certified as a 501(c)3 non-profit. Some crowd funding organizations will not help you unless you are already a certified non-profit.

This is where Community Ventures, Inc (CV) comes to the rescue! This company has already done all the early heavy lifting. It is a 501(c)3 organization whose mission is to partner with start-up social ventures which are not certified as 501(c)3 organizations. The win-win of this partnership is that the start-up contracts with “CV” to accept tax deductible donations from the project’s donors. Some donors then get a tax benefit depending on their tax status. Community Ventures, Inc pays out funds to the project as needed from time to time using the dollars in the project’s treasury. The costs to the social venture is a small initial set-up charge plus a small management fee depending on the degree of management the charity’s program requires of CV. That fee depends on the project and the support the venture needs to get started.

If you are a struggling social venture or charity and need a partner to jump-start your fund-raising program, you might want to make application to Community Ventures, Inc. Send an email to the following email address and “Channelle” will discuss the application process and if initial approval is made, she will set up an interview. You can also email Community Ventures, Inc to be added to their email contact list so they can let you know about their special programs on social entrepreneurship and supporting living wages for those who are underemployed in the Greensboro area.

Here is their email address: “channelle@communityventuresinc.org”