Greensboro Voice Mission Statement

Our newspaper aims to serve as a vehicle for elevating voices and public discussion on issues that are not frequently covered in mainstream media outlets. These issues include homelessness, facing potential homelessness and the resources available to help those in need. This newspaper is for everyone: people experiencing homelessness, students, parents and anyone else who wants to have his or her voice heard. We hope the awareness gained from our newspaper will encourage the community to have a discussion about issues and people who are normally ignored.

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Invictus

Out of the night that covers me
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.
In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced or cried aloud.
Under the bludgeoning of chance
My head is bloody but unbowed.
Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds and shall find me unafraid.
It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll.
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.
-W.E. Henley

Do Not Judge

By Lori Shepard

Do not judge

Do not assume

To know the life of

That stranger in the room

Or across the street

Holding a sign

Or standing and waiting

There on the line

Their life story

You cannot know

Just by looking

High and low

It’s true that some

Are in despair

But you don’t know

What  put them there

So do not judge

Do not assume

Why not smile

Across the room

Read that sign

Be more aware

At the very least

Offer up a prayer

Find a way

If you can

To make a difference

To your fellow man

Find a cause

To work or finance

Help someone else

To have a chance

Count your blessings

Find something to do

Remember, in an instant

That stranger could be you

Friends

 

By Natasha Toussaint

On the first day of work orientation, I befriended Kenneth, a co-worker. Kenneth was always well-dressed, always in a good mood, and hysterically funny. He excelled in all of the training modules, and helped me when I had difficulties with the material. When we had settled into our work, I was able to rely on Kenneth to help me with work-related snags, and on occasion we ate lunch together.
Kenneth had a son who was a College Junior. Kenneth beamed with pride when he talked about him. He often said his son was his best friend.

One week, Kenneth was unable to get his usual ride home. He asked if I would take him. Later that week, after we finished taking care of some of his errands, I asked him if there was anywhere else he needed to go, like the grocery store, or if he would like to get something to eat. He said no and looked at his watch. I took the hint and asked if he would like me to drop him off at the library where I’d picked him up.

“No,” he replied. “You can drop me off at the Salvation Army. I’m homeless.”
I was stunned. Kenneth had been homeless for over 5 years due to a series of unfortunate life events.

In hindsight, I realized why Kenneth was more excited about the new job than the rest of us. For him the job meant change and stability. He hoped one day to get a place of his own.
Kenneth gave me the opportunity to change my perspective of homeless individuals. Homelessness is not a look, an attitude, behavior or a condition. Homelessness is a life situation that for a multitude of reasons can befall any of us, at any time.

The Gardens at the IRC

by Stephanie Thomas

Frequently, the “outside” of a homeless shelters is stark, but the Interactive Resource Center (IRC ) at 407 East Washington Street in Greensboro NC is an exception to the rule. The IRC is landscaped with gardens and trees. What’s even more remarkable is that the gardens and trees produce food including vegetables, herbs, strawberries, black berries, and blue berries, plus 12 different types of trees including apricot, pear, plum and fig. When the gardens were first created, 4 1/2 years ago, they were primarily vegetable gardens. Over time, there was a realization that vegetables not only required high maintenance, and needed excessive amounts of watering, but they were not as useful to people with no means to cook or store them.

I dropped by the IRC one Friday morning to meet with Charlie Headington, the head of the Greensboro Permaculture Guild.  When I arrived, Charlie and his fellow volunteers, Robb Pritchett and Audrey Waggoner, were busy pulling weeds. It was only 11:00 am but hot and everyone had already built up a sweat.

Charlie showed me around the gardens, pointing out particular plants, and explaining what they were. I recognized the fruit bearing plants of course, but many of the plants which looked like weeds to me were in fact there for a particular purpose. The gardens are all natural and rather than using pesticides, they use particular plants and even certain bugs to help keep the gardens healthy.

Not only do folks, like those at the IRC shelter who are without homes, need fresh food, but many of Greensboro’s residents live in food deserts and would benefit greatly from these public gardens. (A food desert is an urban area in which it is difficult to buy affordable or good-quality fresh food).

The Greensboro Permaculture Guild has a number of public gardens in Greensboro, maintained by their 25 active members. They have gardens at St. Elsewhere, The Children’s Museum, Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, First Presbyterian Church and the public orchard on Church Street, just to name a few.

As I watched the volunteers hard at work, I wondered if the IRC guests knew why these gardeners were there or if they appreciated the work. There were a number of individuals sitting outside so I walked over and asked one of the gentlemen what he knew about the gardens. He answered my question when with enthusiasm and pointed out many of the plants and trees, showing a particular fondness for the fig trees.

“It’s good for the people who come here. It’s good for their soul. They need beauty as well as food. And these gardens provide both.” – Charlie Headington